Emerging Hotel Trends Offer Work/Life Balance

In the December 2013 issue of Hospitality Design Magazine, Martin Raymond of UK-based retail and hospitality brand consultancy group, Future Laboratory, explores developing trends in the industry. Among these trends, hotel brands appealing to two different types of global travelers in the 45 and younger demographic: the Bleisure and LATTE crowds.

Bleisure
The 25- to 35-year-old demographic that “blur the lines between business and pleasure.” Who’s specifically designing for this group? Pullman Hotels and Resorts in France. After extensive research, Pullman found that 85 percent of travelers say that technology allowing them to work remotely has merged their personal and professional lives; 79 percent believe this is a positive change.

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Pullman Hotels’ London property features the Business Playground, designed by Mathieu Lehanneur. The area reflects the “work hard, play hard” brand mantra by including innovative spinoffs of traditional boardroom finishings. The main conference table features a poker table-esque leather edge for comfort and attendee engagement during long meetings.

canopy-break-by-mathieu-lehanneur-designboom

Guests can briefly unwind from screen time by relaxing under a canopy break, an oversized digital nature-inspired lampshade. These small details are designed to spark creativity and remove the barrier between work and play.

LATTE
The 35- to 45-year-old crowd seeking Local, Authentic, Traceable, Trusted and Ethical hospitality brands. The LATTE crowd values a work/life balance and wants this equilibrium in their lives, according to Future Laboratory’s trend research. Research shows LATTEs feel overwhelmed by technology and want to occasionally escape the Internet.

mathieu-lehanneur-canopy-break-designboom

Who’s designing for LATTEs? The Renaissance Pittsburgh where guests can choose the Zen and Art of Detox package. When checking in, travelers leave their computers and cell phones at the front desk. The rooms have no TV or telephone but are stocked full of books and board games, allowing families to reconnect without digital interference.

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